Monday, April 18, 2016

Great Designs in Wood (66) - Fabulous Furniture

Jeff Wartluft forwarded an email with these pictures attached. No details with them, but they are all so unique they're worth posting just for inspirational purposes.

This first table looks like it was harvested from the Lord of the Rings forest.


Remember the post on the reciprocal frame roof? Well, here's a really, really big one.


Love the symmetry of the legs and the table top.


Welcome home.


For the forest child who has everything.


Wonder what this guy would do with a redwood?


Elegance with function.


Does anyone else see "grub" when you look at these chests?


Absolutely awesome staircase.


What a great conversation table...for wood scientists to bore their guests.


The ultimate trophy room gun cabinet.


Now here's one I can afford...and would use.


As my daughters would say....Ahhhwwwwwwwwwww.


OK, now this one I want. Pass the rum and be quick about it, matey...arrrrgh!


Far better than a metal hook...


Very popular with first-time mothers.


Now that's what I call  a wood turning.


What a great way to save an old heart for posterity.


The end stool makes it.


Not sure what the slide is for...kids, or bowling ball?


What a great way to end...with a hot soak in a magnificent wooden vessel. 

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Firewood for the Lumbersexual

As you can imagine, lots of feedback on Monday's lumbersexual post. Some of you are just downright uncaring! But Bob Mayer from Indiana was much more understanding... he shared the following video that demonstrates that the modern lumbersexual is really much more competent than the Dinty Moore video would have you believe. It demonstrates that indeed, the world is changing, and you're just not looking at things in the right way.


Tuesday, April 5, 2016

A (Real) Logger Speaks Up

Occasionally I get a ping from my logger friend Martin Melville, who you may remember swinging from my butternut tree last summer. Yesterday's lumbersexual video reminded me of a recent blog post of Martin's, describing the real world that the logger operates in. Thought you might enjoy what a real logger sees from his side of the world.
"Loggers are typically disempowered. We are on the bottom of the pecking order. We wind up dealing with scenarios that others- -foresters, sawmills, and land owners—create. I have often been told that “foresters don’t respect us.” Contract provisions require us to (figuratively) sign our lives away and post our first-born as bond. Sawmills often pay more for timber on the stump than they do for logs delivered to the mill. One outcome is that we are very good at finding ways to “make it work.” If there’s a “rock” (read: barrier) in the way, what are (in today’s jargon) the possible work-arounds? Another result is to invoke the prayer of St. Francis: Lord help me change the things I can, accept the things I can’t change, and the wisdom to know the difference. The list of things beyond our control is long: weather, the cost of fuel, the cost of equipment, whether the guys show up for work, contract provisions, (sometimes) the timber we cut, the rate we can charge per ton or per thousand board feet. For instance:"
You can read the rest of Martin's post here at his blog, martinstrees. 


Monday, April 4, 2016

Lumbersexual Chainsawing

Sometimes an ad strikes a chord that really gets to the heart of the matter. This one says so much about the world we live in.
"For over 80 years, Dinty Moore has fed the lumberjack-sized hunger of hardworking men. Unfortunately the number of lumberjacks is dwindling. But the good news is that lots of men aspire to look like a lumberjack. Dinty Moore believes these "lumbersexuals" can do more than just look like a lumberjack."

Dinty Moore - Lumbersexual Campaign - Chainsaw from BBDO MPLS on Vimeo.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Notes from the Road (4) - Glulam Beams and Roof Trusses

You've all been there.

You're sitting in church, and the preacher has just made a rousing appeal to your higher senses. Your heart quickens, you get a lump in your throat, you raise your eyes toward the heavens, and you find yourself wondering...

How did they make those great wooden beams up there?

Well, now you know.




The folks sharing this mystery of the universe are the good folks of Rigid-Ply Rafters, a Pennsylvania company based in Richland, just east of Harrisburg. It's really a rather simple process. The lumber components are glued on the face, then stacked into the appropriate design in the large clamping device seen in the video. Then the clamps are tightened on each side; the beam is held until the glue is cured; and then the beam is removed and trimmed to final dimensions.

Rigid-Ply also makes prefabricated roof trusses, and I shot this quick video mainly to time the process.



Two-and-a-half minutes. That's pretty darn quick, especially when you compare it to the time framers spend building the same thing on-site. And the steel plate fasteners provide a much stronger connector than nails driven in at angles by framers hanging in the air by one arm. So, the modern prefabricated wooden building component is generally a higher quality product produced more efficiently than the stick-built buildings of days past.

Unfortunately, that good story is not the end of the story. Efficiency is a never-ending process, and at some point, human workers just aren't cost-effective enough.


Looks like the best skill for the future is to be a robot technician.

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Notes from the Road (3) - Winter Logging the Pennsylvania Woods

Last week I was out showing around a VIP visitor to Penn State. Dr. Ivan Sopushynskyy is a visiting professor from the Ukrainian National Forestry University and he's here for a few months to look around and see what he can learn to enhance his research and teaching over in Ukraine.

My friend Andy Blazewicz is a consulting forester here in Central PA, and he offered to take us out to a job site. We visited a site where he's overseeing a 53-acre clearcut designed to enhance wildlife habitat and to provide hunting opportunity for the landowner. The following video gives you a sense of what it's like to be out in the woods while logging is going on. Andy talks forestry to Dr. Sopushynskyy and logger Rocky Souders tells us about his Bell harvester.




I'll post more from our travels together over the next couple of months.

Monday, February 15, 2016

Wood Science 101 (23) - How Wood is Made

I recently republished an article on the World of Wood blog that has gotten great feedback, so I thought I would pass it along to our Go Wood readers as well. Originally published in 1949 in the Bulletin of the Wood Collectors Society, it may be perhaps the simplest and therefore best narrative I've read on that miracle of nature, How Wood is Made.

Thanks again to my friends of the International Wood Collectors Society for allowing me to share this great story with all.

Friday, January 15, 2016

Wood Science 101 (22) - Which Log or Pellet is Right for Your Stove?

Last post I alluded to my work talking to folks about firewood and pellets at the Pennsylvania Farm show. I thought today I would share those ideas with the rest of you.

1. Firewood

People love to talk firewood, especially if they burn it for heat. This year, our display included about a dozen different sticks of firewood. But these sticks were special. All were of different species, and sizes...but they all had the same mass, or what we call in wood circles, dry weight.

Testing folks knowledge of the wood they burn.
I kept the labels turned down and let folks see if they could guess a few of the species. Most couldn't, although a few picked out oak and maple.

My favorite demonstration was to pick up a piece of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia, fifth from the bottom in the picture) and hold it up against the piece of Douglas-fir (Pseuodtsuga menziesii, third from bottom). The two pieces are almost exactly the same length, but the locust is only about half the thickness of the Douglas-fir. When asked which piece of wood provided the most heat, many folks would guess the Douglas-fir, simply because it was twice the size.

But of course, you know the rest of the story...since the two pieces weigh the same amount, and energy value is roughly correlated to mass of the wood, then the two pieces contained roughly the same heating value, even though the stick of Doug-fir was much larger. Which then led us on the the importance of density of different species, knowing which species is which, and relating the price per cord (which is a volume, not a weight measure) to whether or not a certain cord of firewood is worth the price being asked. Sometimes we even got into the moisture content of the wood.

If you care to dig more deeply into the topics, there are many good online references, including

Firewood BTU Comparison Charts at chimneysweeponline.com, and

Heating with Wood: Species Characteristics and Volumes by Utah State Extension authors Michael Kuhns and Tom Schmidt, which has some great explanatory text, charts with firewood properties, and diagrams on different measures of firewood.

2. Pellets

My conversations with folks on wood pellet stoves were even more interesting, because pellet stove owners, on average, seem to know much less about wood and what makes their stove work well and what doesn't. But they all want to know the bottom line...what is the best brand of pellet?

Most of the conversations were held around the pellet pit while we watched their kids and grandkids dig around and organize the pellets.

Highlight of the farm show for two-year-olds.
As for the golden question, I explained to them that pellet stove effectiveness is a function of many variables...size of space being heated, brand of stove, quality and species of the pellets, outside temperature variation, home construction and insulation, and on and on. Where it got interesting was in a few cases, the folks countered with stories of trying Brand A versus Brand B and deciding that Brand A pellets went further. My usual response to comments of this type is..."And the outdoor temperature was the same when you tried the two different brands?"

[Deer in headlights look.]

So on the way home Sunday night, I got to thinking...there has to be a way for folks to make a somewhat reliable comparison of pellets. And this is what I came up with...

1) Buy two or more different brands of pellets, preferably by the bag.
2) Set your pellet stove on your preferred temperature setting...AND DON'T ADJUST IT DURING THE TRIAL. You can turn it down to a night-time setting each evening, if you make sure to turn it down and back up at the exact same times each day. Keep temperature fiddlers away from the thermostat.
3) Begin a week on one brand of pellets, and stay on that brand for a whole week.
4) Each day, write down the high and low outdoor temperatures for the day, and from these, calculate the average temperature for the day. (High + low)/2
5) At the end of the week, record the average temperature for the week (sum of daily averages / 7) and record the total amount of pellets used during the week.

Keep a simple chart that looks something like this:


In this simple example, we can see that even though the average temperature was about 2 degrees (F) lower in Week 1 using Pellet X, about three fewer bags were used to keep the house warm. Here we have quantitative proof that Pellet X was more effective for this home and this stove.

This trial could be extended for as many brands as you care to try, and the longer the trial is extended, the better. I would recommend running the trial for at least a month, and preferably for an entire heating season. Over the course of several weeks. you can average the weekly results for each brand, and eventually the temperature averages during which you trialed each brand will converge to nearly the same average temperature...but the total usage of each brand will differ by the effectiveness of each pellet in your home, under your heating requirements with your stove.

If you care to take your analysis to the next step, you could compare the pellet effectiveness achieved during your trial to the cost of each pellet product. For instance, say you find that at an average outdoor temperature of 30 degrees F over several months, you used 10% more of Pellet Y than Pellet X. So Pellet X is more effective in your stove, right? But, if Pellet Y is 20% less expensive than Pellet X, they Pellet Y makes more sense from a pellet cost standpoint.

Many folks worry more about ash content than they need to...the major brands are certified to PFI standards to contain less than 1% ash content, and most contain even less than that. If you find a certain brand to produce too much ash consistently over time, then you'll know it, and the efficiency and cost effectiveness testing described above will help you decide if that extra amount of ash is worth the trouble.

So, have some fun the rest of this winter, and take control of your wood heating solution. Crank the numbers and increase your satisfaction in warm, bright wood heat.

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Going Wood at the Pennsylvania Farm Show

About ten years ago, I started working the Pennsylvania Farm Show for Penn State Extension. What a joy that has been.

For those of you that have never been to the show, you would find it, as I did, both a trip back into history, and a reminder of how fine most people still are these days. The show itself looks like something right out of the Saturday Evening Post of the 1950's, with cattle, horses, pigs, chickens, rabbits, and prize-winning fruits,vegetables and nuts in abundance.

This fine lady didn't like the smell of the smoked brisket sandwich I was holding.
Mr. Ed's grandson holds a press conference.
Dairy and proud of it!
Majesty in harness.
Off in the distance, a crowd swarmed around a well-lit display. Wondering, I elbowed through the crowd to get a better look...


...well, of course, it was the world-famous Pennsylvania Butter Sculpture winning entry.

That's a lot of butter.
Not far from the butter display, was the object of my interest...the wood display by the Pennsylvania Forest Products Association and the Pennsylvania Hardwoods Development Council.




Inside the Woodmobile, an exhibit that travels the state for educational purposes at fairs, schools, and other public venues.
Now, the wood exhibit is a fine thing, and it attracts a lot of folks out to satisfy their love of wood. Including this fellow, who obliged to sing and tell me a story or two.



Well, I had to get back to work, so I made my way over to the Penn State bioenergy exhibit. Here's my friend and bioenergy expert Dan Ciolkosz, who organizes the exhibit each year. He's pretending to be working a little, by pointing to the bundles of switchgrass, willow, and miscanthus that he and others in Pennsylvania have been working with in recent years to develop the bioenergy industry.


As for me, I mostly just played with all the kids who stopped to dig in the little blue pool of wood pellets, and talked to their parents about firewood and pellet stoves.

If you're within driving distance of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the 100th annual Pennsylvania Farm Show runs through this weekend, and it's free to the public. Spending a day walking around, taking it all in, watching the rodeo, and eating fried pickles, is one of those things that makes for fond memories.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Going Wood for Christmas Cheer

Everyone knows wood comes from trees, right?

But folks around the world have discovered that trees can come from wood! And just in time for Christmas.

Down under, where Christmas is usually a sunny affair, one can build a tree out by the pool with cool drink in hand.



Or, if you happen to live near the coast, a driftwood Christmas tree can build holiday memories.


Now, if you live in the rolling hills of Italy, where woodworking is truly a lifestyle passion, you can do a wooden tree, first class.


But here in the States, we have an affinity for making good things from old pallets. Why not a Christmas tree?


This last video was made by a US Army veteran in Tennessee, who is using a GoFundMe effort to build a woodshop for fellow veterans to have a place to chill when not on duty.
"So here is the goal. I'm going to open my home and shop to active duty and vets as a past time program to get them out the house or single soldiers living in the barracks some time to unwind. The goal is to keep them from sitting around and being idle and give them a place to escape that is positive. We would like to be able to have a big brother program on the weekend so our vets can help children that need a mentor. I need to replace my temporary garage with a bigger steel building. Upgrade some of my diy tools to a little better ones and stock up on some building supplies. My long term goal is to employ solders and vets as a way to fund the program further an provide job for vets that really need help.."
 What a great way to Go Wood...why not get in the spirit of the season and help them out?

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Wood Scence 101 (21) - The Mystery of Wood and Water

The SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry is holding their annual Kiln Drying Workshop again next month. While the program is considered one of the premier and must-attend workshops for professional hardwood kiln operators, there might be reasons for you to consider a trip to upstate New York in the dead of winter.

As much love for wood as I find out in the world, I also constantly see a great deal of misunderstanding of the issue of wood, water, weathering, mold, rot, warpage, and other moisture-related wood performance issues. Quick story from this weekend at the Ray mansion...I had been given a small gift-size oak barrel several years ago, designed for seasoning a bottle or two of whiskey. I had used it a few times, but made the mistake of trying it for wine (which didn't work well, because the wine needs to be consumed shortly after the bottle is uncorked), and the wine residue tainted the barrel enough so that it was no longer good for further use in seasoning whiskey.

My eye landed on the deserted barrel this weekend, and I had the brilliant idea that it would make a great in-tank prop for my aquarium. So, I picked up the barrel, headed outdoors to fill it with sand, brought it back in and sank it in the tank. It looked great.

But then the family questions began, with several of the little wood rats wondering if the barrel wouldn't "rot away" in the tank. I was aghast, and explained more than once that wood rotting is a function of wet-dry cycles in wood...and that wood that stays saturated with water will last forever, at least until some organism in the water might possibly consume it. In my fish tank, the chances of that happening are very, very small.

That experience got me to thinking about how folks really don't understand wood relationship with water, and why wood drying, seasoning, and finishing are done improperly so often. Wooden decks, roofs, and siding are the worst case scenarios, as they are constantly exposed to extremes in temperature, ultraviolet light, and temperature...and with improper drying and maintenance, they often disintegrate in short order.

Wooden furniture and crafts also tend to fall apart when improperly dried and stored lumber is used in its construction. The hardwood dry kiln operators job is to ensure that it doesn't happen...but even in the professional ranks, I find operators who seemed genuinely confused about how to make end-of-kiln-cycle decisions according to how the specific load has responded in the kiln.

I also find that more often that not, persons involved in the sales of wooden furniture give absolutely incorrect information when discussing the qualities and environmental properties of the wooden products they represent.

Crafters at the local fairs often create their works of art under conditions and using techniques and materials that practically guarantee their short life.

And non-woodites routinely make wood products purchasing decisions under misguided assumptions about how that product can be used in application.

All reasons why I would like you to consider attending SUNY's Kiln Drying Workshop next month. Even if you're not one of the folks who dry lumber for a living, you'll find that a few days spent learning the science of how to properly remove moisture from wood will benefit every aspect of your appreciation of it as one of the greatest of raw materials on the planet.

Here are some details on the workshop. Only five days left to take advantage of the early registration rates.

If you truly are one to Go Wood, you'll find it time and money well spent.

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Art for the Rest of Us

Have you ever been to one of those fancy art museums, looked at a huge splat of paint on the wall, and wondered...what the...?!!!?

If so, then this next video will probably gratify your sense of a true work of art.




Thanks go to Bill for passing this along.

Friday, December 4, 2015

Entertaining the Little Ones

No woody stuff today, just a smile and laugh passed on by one of our GoWood friends, Ryszard Szymani, in the spirit of the holiday season. Godere!


Wednesday, November 18, 2015

It's a Small, Small World (of Wood)

By far the best thing about writing this blog is getting personal feedback from Go Wood readers. Yesterday, after the posting of "A Trip to the Mountain Above Turmero", I received two such pieces of feedback...one an interesting modern-day version of a similar trip, and the second a piece of information that could fairly be called an incredible coincidence.

Story One

IWCS member Michael Nee shares his recent encounter with the mountains of Bolivia...
Chuck,

OK, you asked for it. Interesting story from Venezuela. Here's mine.

 The sandstone cliffs of Serrania de Chochis seen from our lodging. There are only two trails to the top.
Saturday (Nov. 14, 2015) we were at Chochis, Bolivia, a little town at the base of a spectacular escarpment, the highest range in the eastern half of the country, at 1245 m (about 3700 ft). We took the dirt road (after eating at places with chickens clucking around begging for bread crumbs) alongside the escarpment to one of the two places where it is possible to climb up.

The weather report was predicting a high for the day of 100 deg F. The first part was a steep climb on a dirt trail through forest with no breeze at all.

Then began the part which was more a scramble up nearly vertical places, with sometimes a rope tied to a tree to give some help. As we got higher and surrounded on both sides by vertical cliffs, our narrow gap had "forest", or rather trees growing out at an angle, including PodocarpusMy climbing companion, Daniel Villarroel, is a Bolivian getting a PhD at the Unversidade de Brasilia in Brazil.  He was specifically after a new species of Myrtaceae which he had collected in flower, but was hoping to find in fruit. We in fact did find it--and with fruit--so now he has enough material to publish it. 
 A tree in the Myrtaceae family, new to science, and this the first discovery of the fruits.

Most things we saw he was familiar with because of his research, and it was "that is a new record for this range, and it was only described two years ago", "that Schefflera of the Araliaceae is a new species, but we're not sure what to call it yet", "that species has only been collected once before and is only found on this mountaintop".

Needless to say, whenever I have the opportunity to collect wood for MADw, I get a piece. But on this trip I was not getting much wood, because we had the whole climb back down that precipitous trail and already had more material in the plant presses than when we came up. At least we had pretty near finished all the many liters of water we were smart enough to bring along, and that lightened the load a little.

The top of the range is a grassland with shrubs and small trees and full of frantastic sandstone formations. Put 18°07’53”S, 60°00’24”W into Google Earth to see where we climbed to
A view from the side of the Serrania looking down on the plains.

Byrsonima tree huddled among the rock formations on the top of the Serrania.
Then it was time to go back down, easier on the lungs but harder on the legs than scrambling up. Much of the way down I spent sliding on my behind and carefully searching for secure footholds. We did manage to find a Podocarpus in "seed" which we had not noticed on the way up, and a mystery tree which I still am completely stumped on after 30 years of working in Bolivia.

The climb up was 670 meters (about 2100 ft) vertically from the dirt road to the top of the mountain, and so it was also 670 meters back down. My legs are still sore (Tuesday).

Now the question is, why am I still doing this when it won't be long until my 70th birthday??
Great story, Michael. Answer to your last question..."Because you can."

Story Two

I was across the hall in the Hoverter Wood Operations Research laboratory yesterday afternoon, looking at specimens of our Penn State Xylarium (wood collection).  I've recently been examining specimens from the extensive collection of IWCS member Dennis Brett of New Jersey; there are over one hundred boxes of his specimens in the lab.

While digging through one of the boxes, I had the inclination to call Dennis...we hadn't talked since the World of Wood 2015 event we held here at Penn State this summer. (Sorry, forgot I hadn't posted anything about that yet...need to catch up!) Anyway, Dennis is doing fine, having just celebrated his 80th birthday in excellent health.

Now Dennis is an interesting guy. He started collecting pieces of wood as a 10-year old growing up in New York City, and made it a life-long passion. As a teenager, he joined the IWCS in its formative years, and he met and traded with some of the founders of the Society, including the original founder, Mr. Harold Nogle of Newton County, Texas. As we chatted, I mentioned the article about Turmero and its author, J.H. Standen.

What Dennis told me next blew me away. Dennis knew Mr. Standen, and had purchased specimens from him. In fact, he had a box of Standen's Venezuelan specimens in his collection...and that box was sitting somewhere in our lab, just a few feet away from me!

Think about that for a second...a fellow collects wood samples from a mountain in Venezuela in 1949 (Dennis told me he thinks Mr. Standen was working as a consultant to Ford Motor Company at the time, which was thinking of building a plant near there), he sells many of those samples to a young man in New York City, who shares them with a professor at Penn State University sixty-six years later. And that professor, without knowing anything of the samples, or their existence a mere few feet away from him, posts the story of the collection of them using a communication technology that wasn't even dreamed of in the time in which they were collected.

Will you agree with me that the coincidence borders on the incredible?

We'll have to wait for the rest of this story...I have to go through the boxes one by one, and they don't really have any identification on the boxes. So, one of these days, hopefully soon, I'll find samples of the rare species mentioned by Mr. Standen in his travel account of so many years ago.

What a small, small, world. And while traversing it, Go Wood.

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Wood Collecting, Back in Time

I may have mentioned in this space that I started a new blog, World of Wood, based on the archives of a journal of that name published by the International Wood Collectors Society. Today I posted another wonderful old adventure from the days when wood collecting really was an adventure.

And although I usually send the link to the post out only to IWCS members, I thought this one was so nice that I thought it might appeal to a broader audience. From when times were simpler...

A Trip to the Mountain Above Turmero


Enjoy...

cdr


Monday, November 16, 2015

Winter in the Woods

As things cool off down here in the states, we start dreaming of roasted turkeys and trimming the family Christmas tree. In the back of our minds, though, we're going through the mental checklist of winter preparedness: fresh coolant in the vehicles, firewood cut and stacked, pipes winterized, and salt and shovels at the ready.

But not so tough, compared to winter loggers in the northern reaches of Canada, eh?




These high-quality videos provide excellent detail on the logging process that you don't often get...number of truckloads a day, cost of broken components, how the machines work. They give us a good appreciation of the capital and human investment necessary to keep the front end of the wood products industry humming, when the rest of us are huddled by the fire. Good job, boys.

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Notes From the Road (2) - The Sound of Music

Had a full week visiting wood plants last week. The best stop was a visit to the Martin Guitar Company in Nazareth, Pennsylvania. You may recall that we took a video tour of the plant as part of a previous Go Wood post.



Well, news is good in Nazareth. Company folks affirmed that yes, the guitar business is booming...so much so, that the company expanded its manufacturing capacity to a new operation in Mexico a few years ago. When a thing is good, it will live on.



Certain things stood out to me as I toured the plant with members of the New England Kiln Drying Association. As one who has been through hundreds of wood operations, and seen the good, the bad, and the ugly, I can tell you...this operation is well-managed. Very well managed. It shows in the plant, and on the faces of the employees as they speak of their work.




In the milling operation, every unit of lumber is clearly identified and quantified.


As components are manufactured, they are tracked with precision through the process, so that both stock and custom guitars can be made in the shortest possible time.




As we learned in "The Secret of Stradivari", the internal design of a musical sound box is the key to the tonal quality of the instrument. Martin has their own internal designs, and each component is manually shaped by human hands to achieve the aged sound Martin guitars are famous for.



The sides of the guitar are curved in an interesting process, one that has been improved by the employees so that it cuts the time for this step of the process in half.



Every woodworker knows the value of proper sanding in the process. Here, in a great example of efficient cellular processing, boxes are sanded to a smooth surface prior to final finishing. One person noted the absence of dust in the factory...the guide smiled and said something like..."Five million dollars buys a heck of a dust removal system." I may be wrong about the amount, but it was a big enough number to make the tourist realize that these guitars are the products of a huge capital investment.

And speaking of huge capital investment...



...meet Marty, the company's resident robot. This thing was amazing in the precision and versatility with which it handled the guitar boxes as it polished them on two large polishing wheels. Another sign of the inevitable rise of the machine in society, even when the products being produced are highly "customized".


I never knew there were so many different types of pearl.


Now, I don't play guitar, but I might buy one of these to carry around just to look good.

And to top off a great visit, I spent some time perusing the Martin museum on site, open to visitors. Wow.





I appreciated the comment of company CEO Chris Martin in the video above when he acknowledges how fortunate he was to be born into a historic guitar manufacturing family, and not an accordion manufacturing family. And yet, he and his employees are more than just fortunate...they are living evidence that love of music, and history, and pride in your work, combined with some ingenuity and a passion to make it always better, will produce great results.